John Day River

The John Day River is a tributary of the Columbia River, approximately 284 miles (457 km) long, in northeastern Oregon in the United States. Undammed along its entire length, the river is the third longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States. There is extensive use of its waters for irrigation. Its course furnishes habitat for diverse species, including wild steelhead and Chinook salmon runs. However, the steelhead populations are under federal Endangered Species Act (ESA) protections, and the Chinook salmon have been proposed for such protection. The river was named for John Day, a member of the Pacific Fur Company's overland expedition to the mouth of the Columbia River that left Missouri in 1810. Day struggled through eastern Oregon during the winter of 1811–12. While…
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Cottonwood Canyon State Park is one of the newest additions ot Oregon’s much adm…
GUIDE
Cottonwood Canyon State Park is one of the newest additions to Oregon’s much adm…
OVERVIEW
John Day Fossil Beds National Monument - colorful outcrops of fossil-bearing san…
GUIDE
The Murtha family ran cattle in the hills along this section of the John Day Riv…
GUIDE
In Oregon’s second-largest and one of its newest state parks, a jeep track leads…
GUIDE
Blue Basin and Island in Time trails; two routes exploring the largest area of e…
PLACE
View of River Below and Sheep Rock Above
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